Ten things we expect from our tango teachers & workshops

Written by Mike (Editor) on . Posted in Whats up

 

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A tongue in cheek message to our lovely tango teachers

1.   Please prepare the lesson ahead. We get anxious when we see you trying out a new routine in front of us.
2.   Better still advertise what you are going to teach in advance and the level it is aimed at. (We’re more likely to come that way).
3.   Try to balance out follower & leader numbers. If people let you down give them a hard time.
4.   If numbers are uneven please remember we’re totally incapable of moving on to other dancers unless you tell us to do so. Treat us like children.
5.   Get stuck in. We expect you to ignore everybody else and dance with us if we are having trouble.
6.   Always provide a demonstration of what we learnt, at the end of the lesson. Keep it simple – one untaught step will cause utter confusion amongst the unimaginative of us.
7.   Don’t be too ambitious. Some of us have pitiful muscle memory. Less may be more.
8.   Be encouraging. We are all incredibly sensitive!
9.   Make a note of what you teach, so when you see us next time you’ll have some idea of the step we’re trying to discuss.
10. Expect married couples to be arguing most of the time. It’s nothing personal!

Mike

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Comments (3)

  • Tom Nickson

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    You make some good points, Mike.

    However, as a Tango Teacher, I have the following observations:

    1. Perfectly justified if the class is being taught by a couple. In my case, a sole teacher, the pupil I am most likely to use in the class often approaches me to know, in advance of the teaching session, what I am proposing to teach. Typically, there is not a private room where we can go through the movements unobserved.
    2. For a one off Workshop, which people will specifically decide to attend, this is not only a reasonable statement but essential, I would say. However, for normal classwork, where I might have 30 people on the books but only a random 15 might turn up on any one night I have found it more productive to observe the group I have in front of me and deliver instruction best suited to their needs. Of course this concept does not apply to teachers who prepare and deliver choreography to whoever turns up rather than attempts to teach them what they need to learn how to dance Tango!
    3. It’s hard enough to get commercially viable classes without antagonising those who might come by giving them “a hard time”. I’m afraid that the gender balance problem in weekly classes is just not something that has a solution.
    4. Agreed!
    5. Agreed – to a degree!
    6. O.K. – but linking the repetition of the step with basic is surely desirable to put it into context.
    7. One man’s too ambitious is another mans boring! A difficult line to tread!
    8. Agreed – I know I used to fail in this area but I hope I am doing better now!
    9. A reasonable request.
    10. Absolutely!!!!

    Well, that’s my twopenneth for what it is worth – I welcome anyone’s feedback to my response if you feel inclined.

    Happy Tango!

    Tom

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  • editor

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    Thoughtful points, Tom.

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  • editor

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    This blog was shared on Facebook where there are lots more comments.

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